Reduce: No Junk Mail

Stand-In #1 – Under construction 🙂

One simple thing you can do that will help protect the environment is to refuse junk mail to be delivered to your letterbox. This is already widely spread in some countries, for exampe in Germany. In Portugal, however, I rarely see this. If this junk mail cannot be delivered to mre and more postboxes, less of it will be produced. This will reduce waste, save resources like wood, water and electricity during the production of the paper

In many cases a simple “No junk mail”-sticker will not suffice, because this might not exlude free newspapers and other forms of advertisement. It is best to state exactly, which kinds of mail you do not want to receive. You can prevent your post box from being stuffed with unwanted catalogs, fliers and other unsolicited, unaddressed junk mail by applying one of the following stickers to your post box. In some countries, however, you have to additionally register in a certain list in order to refuse all the types of junk mail.

Below, you can find a list of countries with a few relevant facts and infos and the respective sticker. Is your country not in this list yet? We are constantly adding the respective stickers, so please send us a link to the sticker or let us know what “No junk mail, please” is in your language. Leave us a comment!

Austria:

“The paper consumption per capita in Austria is 257 kg. This is almost twice as much as the EU average. A considerable proportion of this amount are unwanted advertisements, which usually end up unread in the waste. A Viennese household receives up to 100 kg of advertising material via postal and door delivery per year.” (Source: konsument.at, translation by me). More info can be found on the website die-umweltberatung.

austria

France:

“… on average, a French household receives 40 kg of paper advertisements each year. […] In France, more than 10 million people have chosen to say no to advertising leaflets to avoid unnecessary waste of paper.” (Source: Stoppub.fr)

france

Germany:

“Deutschland verbraucht so viel Papier wie die Kontinente Afrika und Südamerika zusammen. Der Pro-Kopf-Verbrauch von Papier in Deutschland steigt kontinuierlich und wird mit 253 Kilogramm (2006) nur von wenigen Länder der Erde übertroffen.” (Source: WWF).

In some areas of Germany, the stickers will not deter all of the junk mail, you have to additionally register on a so called “Robinsonliste”. For more information, check out this article from the Verbraucherzentrale or the website werbestopper.de. You can also find the Robinsonliste here.

keine-werbung

Netherlands:

“The average household in the Netherlands receives more than 1,600 pieces (34 kg) of junk mail (ongeadresseerd reclamedrukwerk) in their letterbox per year. The national campaign against junk mail distributes the ‘Nee/Nee’ and ‘Nee/Ja’ letterbox stickers. The ‘Nee/Nee’ sticker blocks all mail which is not addressed to the recipient, while the ‘Nee/Ja’ sticker allows the delivery of free home-delivered newspapers.”(Source: denhaag.nl)

netherlands

Portugal:

You can find more info and other interesting ideas on this blog.

portuguese

Spain:

Sweden:

“20 years ago (1989) Swedish households received between 15 and 20 kg advertisement material every year. Today, every Swedish household receives nearly 50 kg per year. This amounts to nearly 200 000 tons of paper in a single year.” (Source: reklamfritt.se)

A simple, self-written note on your post box stating “Ingen reklam, tack” suffices to avoid unaddressed junk mail. More info can be found on the website Ingen reklam, tack!

United Kingdom:

Check out the Stop-Junk-Mail-Campaign or Citizens Advice for more.

big-red-no-junk-mail-sign-sticker

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